Tag Archives: Analogy

I May be a Metal Head, but I’m Still Rock ‘N’ Roll

Who would win in a wrestling match, Lemmy or God?

Trick question. Lemmy is God.

The above statement you have just read is a question occasionally used to determine if someone is legitimately rock ‘n’ roll. Lemmy Kilmister, for those of you who don’t know, was the front man for the heavy metal rock band known as Motörhead. A true legend if there ever was one, Lemmy created some of the greatest rock music ever recorded. He also lived the rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle harder than anyone. From a diet almost exclusively of meat and potatoes (he claimed he tried vegetables once and didn’t like them), to a bottle of Jack Daniels and a pack of cigarettes nearly every single day of his life, and to having sex with over three thousand woman (claimed), he was the sin of rock music that our parents warned us about. In the eyes of a rebellious youth, it’s not hard to see how Lemmy is God.

Lemmy was something of a medical anomaly as well. Up until the last few years, he seemed to be in perfect health. Doctors and scientists couldn’t explain it. His lifestyle was the exact opposite of healthy and yet his body was running great. One’s actions have a way of catching up them, however. A few years ago, all sorts of health problems began to manifest themselves and they came quickly. So much so that he had to change his unhealthy lifestyle. When he was diagnosed with diabetes, for the sake of his health, he gave up his Jack Daniels and switched to a bottle of vodka a day.

One thing that was quite interesting about Motörhead is that though they fit very well into the heavy metal category, Lemmy hated that label. The whole concept of subgenres was foolishness to him. As far as he was concerned, Motörhead played rock ‘n’ roll. In fact, they would start their concerts with, “We are Motörhead and we play rock ‘n’ roll.” And this is where I get to the meat of my post.

I’m a metal head. I love metal. But it’s still rock music. I think it’s the best rock music and the label of metal helps to define that. My faith is very much the same way. I am a Lutheran. The Lutheran faith defines what I believe. Lutheranism, however, falls underneath the label of Christian. Other denominations such as Baptist or Calvinist for example can be considered Christian brothers and sisters because we hold to the same basic belief that Christ died for us sinners and it is through him in which we are saved. Yet our beliefs differ enough that we need labels like Lutheran and Calvinist because there are issues of faith which we do disagree on, in many cases, vehemently disagree. Despite such disagreements, those of different denominations can still be our brothers and sisters in Christ. Even if I believe that Lutheranism is the correct one.

That’s not to say that all who claim to be Christian are our brothers and sisters. Metaphorically speaking, the Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and various other “Christian” groups are the Nickelback and Avril Lavigne of Christianity. You’ll never find Nickelback in any rock playlist of mine (or really any playlist of mine for that matter) and you’ll never here me refer to a Mormon as my Christian brother.

Lemmy died two days ago. Supposedly from a super aggressive cancer. In reality, he died of his sins and most likely in his sins. Jesus on the other hand died because of our sins and for our sins. That is something all Christians can agree on, even if they don’t agree on everything.

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It’s Not a Soup

I love canned soup. While a lot of people have a disdain for it, I personally think it’s wonderful. It’s convenient, simple, fits nicely in my lunch bag, and is easily disposable. So when Campbell’s started introducing flavors of other foods I love, I got excited. Cheesy quesadilla. Hearty pizza. And others. It sounded too awesome to be true. I love pizza and quesadillas, but they’re not exactly easy to fit into a lunch bag. It turns out that it was too good to be true. They tasted awful, nothing really like the actual foods. It turns out that repackaging one food as another good is generally a pretty bad idea. In theory it sounds good, but in practice it’s kind of gross.

And yet so often we repackage Jesus as a life coach, a buddy, a financial adviser, a dietitian, and even a creepy bearded girlfriend. Why? It’s never as good as the original. Sure, he might be more convenient that way, but you’ll probably end up disappointed before long.

I’ll take pizza as it is. I don’t need to sacrifice quality in the name of convenience.

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The cure is worse than the disease

A few days ago, I sliced my foot open pretty bad at the beach. I slipped on a rock and left a gash that was probably slightly over two inches long. I bled for about two hours, got light-headed, shaky, and uncontrollable giggles. As I understand, those are side effects of blood loss, so it makes sense. Anyhow, the whole experience didn’t really hurt, but it was severe enough that I needed to go to the emergency room to get stitches. That was fine, they gave me some kind of numbing agent so I wouldn’t feel them go in. Then I went home, watched a show and went to bed. Everything was great. Or so I thought.

I woke up in the middle of the night with an unbearable pain in my foot. It was the stitches. The numbing agent had finally worn off and I felt the full pain of the threads that were holding my flesh together. Receiving the gash was nothing, but these little stitches were awful. I pretty much didn’t walk the next day. And for a few days after that, if I needed to move far, I needed crutches. I still have a few more days before I can have the stitches removed and they’re still painful, but I’m walking unassisted with only a slight gimp. Stitches are awful, but necessary if I didn’t want to be walking around with duct tape on my foot. When it’s done healing, everything will great and certainly much better off than if I had chose to not go to the emergency room.

So, the cure is worse than the disease, or in my case, the bandage is worse than the wound. And as I think about it, that in a sense describes the Christian life. Through receiving saving faith in Jesus Christ, we open ourselves to ridicule, hate, persecution, violence, suffering, and even death. It can be quite a miserable life if you are a Christian. These are all possible side effects of salvation. Both mentally and physically, the cure (faith in Jesus Christ) is often worse than the disease (sin). And yet any doctor will tell you that you need to be cured because the consequences of the disease, as painless as living with it may be, are far worse that the pain the of being cured.

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