Tag Archives: History

Killing the Unborn to Save the Living

Throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, crime was in a rapid rise with no end in sight peaking in 1991. Then, suddenly in 1992, it began to decline for no apparent reason. Then again in 1995 it took a sharp drop. What happened? One of the most probable causes is abortion.

In 1973, Roe VS Wade signaled the legalization of abortion. In 1991, those people born after the Roe VS Wade decision were becoming adults. As more and more children born after that decision became adults, crime would continue to drop more sharply. But what does that decision have to do with crime? Well the prevailing thought goes that as more and more unwanted children were being born, more of those children would grow up to become criminals. As the criminal population grows, it feeds into itself thus increasing crime even more. When abortion became legal, there were less children born into broken homes, less unwanted babies.

It’s not just coincidence either. Other crime related statistics back it up. When crime rates were divided in two groups, those born committed by people born before Roe VS Wade and those born after, crime rates continued to drop only among those born after Roe VS Wade. Crime rates stayed the same for those born before it. If you look at serial killer statistics, this also reinforces it. When you divide serial killers up by the decade of when they made their first kill, most of them showed up in the 1980s. In fact, though the United States only has 5% of the world’s population, it has produced 76% of the world’s serial killers, and 85% of those since the 1980s. Another interesting thing to look at is that for the United States, the most dangerous time to be alive was the 1980s and very early 1990s while today, we are in the safest time to be alive since the 1930s.

So what was the cause of decline in safety and rise in unwanted children? Was it World War II? Maybe. During this time, the US military would ship tested and clean prostitutes from the US mainland to Hawaii for the soldiers to have three minutes of time with. These prostitutes would often service a hundred soldiers a day. Also, many men would marry a woman or pledge to marry a woman they just met days before going off to war, only to come back years later to find that she had fallen in love with someone else and left them. The emotional toll must’ve been astounding. I cannot say these things were the cause of unwanted children, but by looking at the dates, one can presume it contributed to the moral decline that lead to its rise.

So what can we make of this? Is abortion good? Is it necessary for the safety of society? What is the appropriate response of the church?

Well, the slaughter of the unborn is never good, but the church isn’t going to win any battles against statistics either. The war against abortion is like attempting to cure a cold with a decongestant: the symptoms might be alleviated some, but the main problem is still there. Legalized abortion and drastically lower crime has shown us two things. One, people are going to have free sex regardless of the consequences. And two, the killing of the unborn leads to a safer society for the born. So what do we do?

It is my opinion that the church and conservative right need to give up on fighting abortion directly and instead focus on the actual problem; SIN. Protesting more often then not just angers people instead of helping them. Removing legal abortion will cause many women to seek alternative, more dangerous methods. People are going to have sex they shouldn’t be having and abortions regardless of what the law says. Fighting the symptoms is a no win situation.

Restoring traditional family values, preaching the Gospel, teaching right from wrong, helping people understand their sin and need of a savior, these are what is needed. That’s not to say the sin of abortion shouldn’t be preached, but making it the focus is a losing battle. The abortion proponents have statistics on their side. Perhaps rather than trying to eliminate abortion, we need to eliminate the need for abortion.

 

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Christian views on hell: moving back to Origen

This was a great post on a blog that I follow. Perhaps I shall do a blog post at a later date with my thoughts on the ability to rightly comprehend Heaven, Hell, death, and the afterlife in general. For the moment though, I believe my comment in the post (which I have also pasted just below) sums up my thoughts nicely.

I think Hell often gets downplayed because it is so difficult to imagine. The mind cannot rightly comprehend an eternity of suffering so it comes up with ideas that are more familiar to it such as a temporal prison sentence or that it simply doesn’t exist art all. In a way, this is how heresy springs up: we cannot fully comprehend so we make it something we can comprehend.

Churchmouse Campanologist

This follows on from Monday’s post about hell. Please note that there is an adult image and disturbing content in this entry.

In the 1970s my secondary school religion teachers taught that Origen was a heretic and that the Church declared him as well as his teachings anathema. In short, they said that Origen started out as a devout Christian then went off-piste.

My mother told me the same thing years before.

Today, Origen seems to be all the rage. The modern Church has rehabilitated his reputation, and clergy are encouraging us to adopt his beliefs.

Two of Origen’s beliefs concern hell and universalism. Origen held that hell was temporary, akin to a very long-term purgatory, and wrote that there will come a point in eternity when God will accept the population of hell — including Satan — to heaven.

Is that what the Bible says?

As far…

View original post 2,554 more words

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Miracles didn’t happen all the time, but they do now

Sometime I’ll hear the argument that, “According to the Bible, miracles happened all the time. If the Bible is true, why don’t they happen now?” That argument is so terrible flawed that it’s difficult to fathom someone actually using it, yet it happens all the time. Here’s the first problem, miracles as the common world views them didn’t happen all that much and the Bible never makes any sort of assertion that they did. “But just read the Bible,” they say. “They happened all the time.” Okay. I have read the bible and here is what people who make that argument don’t seem to realize. The Bible takes place over thousands of years. On top of that, it follows the lives of what, roughly 30 people or so? More if you include the minor individuals. So what we have here is actually a record of a few miracles that happened to a few people over a few thousand years. When you put it in context, you kind of realize that miracles weren’t just happening all over the place willy nilly. If they did, they wouldn’t be miracles. They’d be common events that people could reasonably expect.

As for the second part, miracles do happen today, though they are not always recognized as such. That is why in the first part, I refered to miracles as how the common world views them.  In fact, there is a miracle that happens today that is greater than in all of scripture. A miracle that I would argue has happened more often in the past two thousand years than in all of scripture combined.  That is whenever an individual is granted salvation through the grace of Christ. There is no greater miracle than that. His shed blood on the cross that you might be saved is proof that salvation is a miracle because if there was something you needed to do, it wouldn’t be much of a miracle now would it.

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