Tag Archives: LGBT Issues

Did God create transgender? (2)

First off, let me apologize for the poorness of the this reblog. I accidentally clicked on the wrong blog when I went to reblog this originally and now it won’t allow me to do so on the proper page. Good job, WordPress. Anyhow, to the point at hand, the blog post shared discusses how we are to act in our fallen state vs how we do act in our fallen state. Considering this particular post on Eiler’s Pizza and the recent post on Comprehending Hell from Churchmouse Campanologist, I think Genesis 5:3 sufficiently answers both. To put it simply, when we find that we can’t get up to God’s level, we try to bring him down to ours. By that, I do not mean to our human level but to our own individual personal level. It becomes all about me and everyone else including God himself be damned.

There’s probably a sermon in that somewhere.

Here’s the post.

Part two: Now how shall we live?

In part one, from the Holy Bible I answered the title question with a clear, “No, God did not create transgender people.”

If God were responsible for creating me as transgender—for creating a person to have Down Syndrome, or autism, or twins to be conjoined, or any variation with which a person might enter the world, I will no longer believe in Him; He is not the God of love and mercy as He describes Himself. Rather, He would be nothing more than a mad scientist, one who enjoys zapping us with every difficult and terrible thing in order to watch us run around like chickens with our heads cut off.

He did not create us this way so that we are born with or acquire many and various things which do not meet the definition of “good.” In part one, I showed from the Holy Bible that all variations in humans arose from Adam’s disobedience, causing us to be fallen and fractured and mortal. That question answered, this one follows: “Now how shall we live?” which breaks down into a twofold, “How shall I act?” and, “How shall I treat others?”

As God in Christ is the Lord of all creation, considering no one…

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Did God create transgender?

I’ve re-blogged various posts from Eiler’s Pizza before and this occasion is no different. I’m sure you’ve read some of his posts before if you’ve come to my blog on multiple occasions. If not, then you may be surprised to know that this former LCMS pastor suffers from a condition called gender-dysphoria. Now, even though he has taken steps towards gender reassignment, his  conscience is still bound by scripture. In this post of his, he does not take the side of many on in the LBGT movement in regards to whether God made him that way. In fact, he states just the opposite. God did not make him that way though he was born that way. In a way, you could say his post is a more thought out and more detailed version of my own post titled, Yes, You Were Born That Way. I encourage you to give it a read.

Eilers Pizza

Part one: God’s Word and trans origins

To answer the title question, I will provide a straightforward reading of the Holy Bible. I am a traditional Christian who reads Scripture as it has been read since antiquity. Everything I present is not an interpretation but what the Holy Bible states, and the conclusions I reach are both theologically sound and scientifically responsible. Those who read Scripture with a different lens might see differently, and those who use other texts likely will arrive at different answers. I will gladly discuss any disagreement.

I use descriptors—normal and abnormal—which bother many people. I use these only to differentiate between the very good initial creation of God and the fallen creation after Adam’s disobedience. Never will I use “normal” to advance anyone or “abnormal” to put down anyone. It will be vital to retain this so that my conclusions might be given a fair…

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Making radio waves

This was a great radio interview. I encourage all to listen to it.

Eilers Pizza

Five years ago, I met Mr. Matthew Pancake at a McDonald’s in Houston. I was a pastoral delegate to our national church convention; he was a lay delegate. The restaurant was the only fast food place on the walk from hotel to convention center. It was always crammed full. Matthew was forced to eat with all sorts of lowlifes.

When he got home, he remembered me and friended me on Facebook. Since I began posting in regard to gender dysphoria, he got involved with the conversation. He told his pastor, the Rev. Gary Held. He told me that Pastor Held and he host a radio program.

Several weeks ago, Matthew asked if I would be interested in being interviewed regarding gender dysphoria and transgender. We did a pre-interview two weeks ago. I didn’t scare them off. Last week, we taped the interview. It aired on their radio stations on Sunday…

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I am a real person

When I was younger, before I was a Christian, there was no problem a good bottle couldn’t fix. It almost always made me feel better. And if it didn’t, I’d eventually pass out and feel better about everything in the morning. I recall one particularly rough night when I drank an entire bottle of whiskey on my own. The next day, I felt great. Since becoming Christian, I don’t drink even remotely like I used to and I don’t need it to solve my problems.

So, when you’ve discovered the greatest thing in the world, how do you help someone who in reality probably understands far better than you ever will? What about when that great thing is of no help to them? I honestly don’t know what your supposed to say, if anything. I suppose the only thing to say is that scripture never promises to fix our problems. The fact that I no longer drink a thirty pack of beer a day could be the result of God’s hand or it could be sheer dumb luck, an outcome of the choices I’ve made. In some respect, a lot of our life comes down to the choices we make.

In a previous post, I pointed out how things that can be used for sin  are not necessarily sinful in and of themselves. Not to say that one who goes through gender reassignment isn’t sinning, but for a hypothetical moment, let’s just say it’s not a sin. How one uses that gender reassignment could make much a sin. I’m not going to go into the ways a gender swap can be used for sin. I’ll let your imagination figure that out. And I’d like to point out for the record that I am NOT saying that Greg would use a gender swap for evil (such as beating up women), I’m just making a point of something that should be considered as it brings a whole new level of required awareness to the table.

I honestly don’t know where I’m going with this right now. I just felt I had to say something and now that I’ve said it, I honestly don’t know where to take it. But here is what Greg has to say…

Eilers Pizza

I am a real person. I cry real tears. I feel real pain. I experience real joy. I express and receive real love.

For all of the joy I experienced after changing my picture and profile yesterday, I experienced an equal measure of hurt. I received new friends; I lost old friends. I received very serious private messages of concern, and messages in which my intentions, by publicly writing, were called a veiled plan to cover the transition of which I was already certain.

I never wanted this time to come. I fought so hard to remain a male. For as peaceful as I feel about my brain and body finally coming into harmony, and the joy I experience living as a female, the good parts never last for long because the next hard thing appears, issues with family and friends and church and on and on.

I constantly return…

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The final post as Greg

I repost this only in that I feel that this is an important topic. I cannot say that I agree or support the direct Greg is heading. I suspect that he will probably be disappointed that I cannot in good conscience recognize him as Gina or refer to him as her. These are things I cannot view as interchangeable nor can I view such changing such words to be right. That said, I still consider Greg a friend and hope that he will remain as such, despite my disagreement. Please read, though I urge you to make your comments directly to his blog and not my repost. I feel such discussion would be better served at the source rather than the relay.

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The question of sin (4 of 4)

In this final installment of the series, The Question of Sin, Greg cuts to the heart of the matter and lays his cards out on the table.

Eilers Pizza

I remain in full unity with the doctrines of God as we believe, teach, and confess them in the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS). While I have been advocating some things with which many (not all) in the LCMS do not agree, and I believe the one study on gender dysphoria published by us is greatly lacking, there is no doctrine of the LCMS with which I am in disagreement.

That I have some disagreement with my church body is not unusual. If you can find two LCMS pastors who agree on the practice of every teaching, even as they confess the same doctrine, then I’ll let you buy me a pizza to tell me about it.

In going public with my condition and my arguments, concern was expressed that I might lead some into sin, and that I might announce that transitioning is a fine and dandy thing. I have…

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The question of sin (3 of 4)

Eilers Pizza

God’s Word, which is my preferred term for the Holy Bible, makes clear what is and is not the Lord’s will for our lives. As my very first seminary professor continually reminded us, when we are not clear on something it is due to our weakness and not from God’s being indistinct.

Smoking can get people, um, smoking. Since God’s Word does not speak to it, most of Christianity leaves it in the arena of personal decision. When I would teach religion to middle-schoolers, I would make two columns on the whiteboard and have the kids list the positives and negatives of smoking. The negatives side contained the typical things like cancer, emphysema, addiction, and expense. The positives side? It was blank. When they wanted me to write, “It tastes good,” I would, but then I would make arrows to all of the negatives. Of course, I did not want…

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The question of sin (2 of 4)

I would like to encourage all to read the comments in regards to this post on his blog. While it got slightly off topic, we got into a discussion on a specific reality of abortion that I don’t really hear many people talk about. I often hear people bring up it up, but never the opposing argument. In my comments, I take up the opposing argument. I actually side with what some may call an extreme that I’m sure many churches wouldn’t even side with.

Eilers Pizza

Today, I turn to specific ways I have been told that transitioning from one’s birth sex is a sinful action.

Deuteronomy 22:5 is the one verse which appears to speak most directly to the issue at hand: “A woman must not wear men’s clothing, nor a man wear women’s clothing, for the Lord your God detests anyone who does this” (NIV).

This is used to run the gamut of issues: crossdressing, drag queens, the fetishistic use of the garments of the opposite sex, impersonating the other sex for the purpose of deception, and transitioning from one sex to the other.

If this edict holds in the New Testament era, I question whether it applies to the person who has a condition, which has the person in a weakened state, who does not desire to offend the Lord or take to the opposite sex out of any illicit desire for the…

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The question of sin (1 of 4)

Eilers Pizza

As I take up the subject of sin, my goal is not to win this discussion, making myself a victor and someone else a loser. After I present the information over these four days, I will not say that I have all of the answers, or even that I have any answers. One is doing foolish work who insists he has every answer. Please, read me as one longing to properly understand himself from both the Word of God AND his physical ailment.

I lead off with discussing a number of areas where attitudes have changed or there is disagreement in my own church body, the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS).

The LCMS takes as serious as any church body the doctrine of God. While the foundational doctrines remain untouched—those taught in the Athanasian, Nicene, and Apostles’ creeds—many second-tier teachings have been juggled; some caught, some swapped, some dropped.

Second-tier doctrines and…

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